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Thread: Virginia governor election 2013

  1. #16
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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013


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    A new Quinnipiac University Poll produced these results.

    In a two candidate race:
    Terry McAuliffe (D).....38%
    Ken Cuccinelli (R).....38%
    don't know/won't say/other.....24%

    In a three candidate race:
    Terry McAuliffe (D).....34%
    Ken Cuccinelli (R).....31%
    Bill Bolling (I).....13%
    don't know/won't say/other.....22%

    More details.
    Virginia (VA) Poll - February 20, 2013 - Two-Way Virginia Governor's Ra | Quinnipiac University Connecticut
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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    From a new poll taken by McLaughlin & Associates on behalf of Bill Bolling.

    In a three candidate race:
    Terry McAuliffe (D).....38%
    Ken Cuccinelli (R).....37%
    Bill Bolling (I).....15%
    undecided.....10%


    While Bolling's horse race numbers are not great, the poll has some good news for him.

    Bill Bolling has the strongest opinion rating. He has the highest favorables (44%) and lowest unfavorables (11%). Ken Cuccinelli’s negatives make him a more polarizing candidate (41% favorable to 27% unfavorable). Terry McAuliffe’s opinion rating is nearly split (25% favorable to 22% unfavorable).
    Full report.
    http://www.billbolling.com/wp-conten...g-02-26-13.pdf
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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    Bill Bolling has said that he will not run for governor as an independent. Those poll numbers showing him at 15% must not have looked very encouraging.
    From CNN political ticker.

    March 12th, 2013
    12:06 PM ET

    Virginia's Bolling says no to indie run for gov.

    CNN Political Editor Paul Steinhauser

    (CNN)
    – It's a two man race in this year's gubernatorial battle in Virginia.

    Republican Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling announced Tuesday that "after a great deal of consideration I have decided that I will not be an Independent candidate for Governor this year."

    In November, the two-term lieutenant governor gave up his bid for the GOP gubernatorial nomination, but declined to endorse the other major Republican candidate in the race, Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, and instead began flirting with a possible independent bid.

    Former Democratic National Committee chairman Terry McAuliffe, a former top adviser to Bill and Hillary Clinton who's making a second run for Virginia governor, is his party's presumptive nominee.

    Bolling said fundraising was a major factor in his decision not to launch an independent bid.

    "To run a winning campaign I would have needed to raise at least $10-$15M. That's a very difficult thing to do without the resources of a major political party and national donors at your disposal," said Bolling in his statement. "Based on my discussions with key donors over the past three weeks, I was confident I could raise enough money to run a competitive campaign, but I was not confident I could raise enough money to run a winning campaign."

    Bolling said that running as an independent candidate would have required him to sever his longstanding relationship with the GOP, which he was not willing to do. And he added that his "decision was heavily influenced by a growing dissatisfaction with the current political environment in Virginia."

    There are strained relations, to put it politely, between Bolling and Cuccinelli, a more conservative favorite of tea party activists. Bolling's bid last year for the Republican gubernatorial nomination was backed by Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell. But Bolling faced long odds against Cuccinelli, since the party's nomination will be decided at a state party convention, often dominated by more conservative activists, which favored Cuccinelli, rather than a primary, which could have favored Bolling.

    Bolling didn't endorse either Republican or Democratic candidates in his statement, saying instead that "I wish Mr. McAuliffe and Mr. Cuccinelli well as they begin their campaigns. One of these two candidates will have the responsibility of leading Virginia into the future."

    But he did seem to take a veiled swipe at Cuccinelli by adding that "our priority should be on electing a Governor who has the ability to effectively and responsibly govern our state and provide the mainstream leadership we need to solve problems."

    McAuliffe picked up on that comment from Bolling, and in a statement released after Bolling's announcement said "I couldn't agree more."

    In a statement, Cuccinelli said "I want to thank Bill Bolling for his years of service to the people of Virginia and his dedication to making our Commonwealth a better place to live, work, and raise a family."

    The most recent poll in the Virginia contest, conducted last month by Quinnipiac University, indicated that Bolling had the support of 13% of voters, with McAuliffe at 34% and Cuccinelli at 31%. Without Bolling in the contest, McAuliffe and Cuccinelli were deadlocked at 38%.

    The Virginia gubernatorial election will be firmly in the national political spotlight this year, as Virginia and New Jersey are the only two states to hold such contests in the year after a presidential election.
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  4. #19
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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    The US Supreme Court tossed out the last sodomy laws in 2003. But that hasn't stopped Ken Cuccinelli from wasting Virginia taxpayer money on pursuing an appeal of an unconstitutional Virginia sodomy law.

    From the Washington Blade.

    Cuccinelli challenges Va. sodomy ruling

    By Lou Chibbaro Jr. on April 3, 2013


    Virginia Attorney General Kenneth Cuccinelli has filed a petition with the 4th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in Richmond asking the full 15-judge court to reconsider a decision by a three-judge panel last month that overturned the state’s sodomy law.

    The three-judge panel ruled 2-1 on March 12 that a section of Virginia’s “Crimes Against Nature” statute that outlaws sodomy between consenting adults, gay or straight, is unconstitutional based on a U.S. Supreme Court decision in 2003 known as Lawrence v. Texas.

    A clerk with the 4th Circuit appeals court said a representative of the Virginia Attorney General’s office filed the petition on Cuccinelli’s behalf on March 26. The petition requests what is known as an en banc hearing before the full 15 judges to reconsider the earlier ruling by the three-judge panel.

    “We certainly hope they won’t,” said Claire Gastanaga, executive director of the ACLU of Virginia, which filed a friend of the court brief urging the three-judge panel to overturn the state sodomy law.

    “We think it’s a situation in which everybody agrees that the statute is unconstitutional,” Gastanaga told the Blade.

    Greg Nevins, an attorney with the LGBT litigation group Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, which joined the ACLU in filing the friend of the court brief calling for overturning the Virginia sodomy law, said requests for en banc hearings are turned down most of the time.

    He quoted a federal appeals court rule as stating, “Although petitions for rehearing are filed in a great many cases, few are granted.”

    Caroline Gibson, a spokesperson for Cuccinelli, told the Blade in an email that Cuccinelli believes the dissenting judge on the three-judge panel was correct in stating the Lawrence decision applies only to sex between consenting adults in private and doesn’t apply to cases involving a minor. The case in which the three-judge panel of the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the Virginia sodomy law involved a man charged with soliciting oral sex from a 17-year-old woman.

    “We believe the panel decision was erroneous, and that the dissent correctly concludes that the petitioner was not entitled to federal habeas corpus relief, Gibson said, referring to the court’s decision to overturn the man’s conviction under the sodomy law. “So the full court should have the opportunity to decide this matter,” she said.

    “Like most people, we think the court made the right decision,” said James Parrish, executive director of the LGBT advocacy group Equality Virginia.

    “We think what needs to happen is the General Assembly needs to remove the current sodomy law that has been declared unconstitutional,” he said.

    Parrish said Equality Virginia wouldn’t object to a careful revision by the legislature of the state’s criminal code to allow for continued prosecution of offenses such as sex with minors.

    “What we’re saying is we agree with the court ruling that, in this case, the law was used unconstitutionally. The best course of action would be for the General Assembly to address that, just like they did with the cohabitation law that they took off the books this year,” he said.

    “We think that’s a better recourse than the Attorney General filing another appeal and diverting precious state resources on an issue that the General Assembly should address because the court made the correct ruling on March 12,” Parris said.

    Virginia State Sen. Adam Ebbin (D-Alexandria), who’s gay, said he is looking into the issue and the possibility of introducing legislation to address it.

    “I’m reviewing this and will consider introducing a bill next year to repeal the Virginia Crimes Against Nature law for consenting adults,” he told the Blade.

    The March 12 ruling of the appeals court’s three-judge panel overturned a lower court decision upholding the conviction of a 37-year-old man charged in 2005 with soliciting a 17-year-old woman to engage in oral sex. No sexual encounter took place, records show.

    The Attorney General’s office argued that the Supreme Court’s Lawrence decision didn’t apply to cases involving minors. But 4th Circuit Appeals Court Judge Robert King, who wrote the majority opinion, said the Lawrence decision rendered the Virginia sodomy statue “facially” or completely unconstitutional.

    He stated other laws could be used to prosecute an adult for engaging in sex with a minor and that the Virginia General Assembly would likely have authority under the Lawrence decision to pass a new law specifically outlawing sodomy between an adult and a minor.
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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    The progressive American Bridge 21st Century PAC has put up a Tumblr featuring some of Ken Cuccinelli's more bizarre and outrageous statements.

    Ken On The Issues



    ^^^ Ken, why not experiment and lead the way?
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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    At their state convention Virginia Republicans nominated three hardline radical conservatives for statewide office. We already know about Ken Cuccinelli II, but the other two candidates are no better.

    From the Washington Post.

    Va. GOP picks conservatives for fall ticket;
    black minister is lieutenant governor choice


    By Laura Vozzella, Published: May 18 | Updated: Sunday, May 19



    RICHMOND — Thousands of Virginia Republicans on Saturday picked a slate of statewide candidates who vowed to stay true to conservative principles, resisting calls to remake the GOP message after losses in 2012.

    At the top of the ticket is gubernatorial hopeful Ken Cuccinelli II, the attorney general. Known for high-profile battles against “Obamacare,” abortion and a university climate scientist, Cuccinelli stood by what detractors have called an out-of-the-mainstream agenda.

    “When did it become extreme to protect children from predators and human traffickers?” Cuccinelli asked. “When did it become extreme to guard our Constitution from overreach? When did it become extreme to secure the freedom of the wrongly convicted? And when did it become extreme to ask government to spend a little less so our economy can grow?”

    He left the stage to the strains of the country music singer Aaron Tippin’s “You’ve Got to Stand for Something.”

    Cuccinelli was one of three conservatives chosen Saturday for the GOP’s 2013 ticket — a reaction, many here at the state party convention said, to last year’s failed presidential bid by Mitt Romney, a Republican they thought was too moderate and waffling.

    E.W. Jackson, a minister from Chesapeake, won the nomination for lieutenant governor with a full-throated appeal for limited government, traditional families and gun rights. “We will not only win an election in November, we will open the hearts and minds of our people and save this commonwealth and save this country,” said Jackson, the first African American nominated by the Virginia GOP for statewide office since 1988.

    For attorney general, the party nominated state Sen. Mark D. Obenshain (R-Harrisonburg), who this year successfully pushed tougher voter ID rules. “Are you ready to stop Obamacare in its tracks?” he asked the crowd in his acceptance speech, eliciting cheers.

    Scrapping plans for an open primary to choose candidates, Republicans held a closed convention, a forum that draws only the most committed activists because it requires travel from all corners of the commonwealth to Richmond. That change prompted Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling (R) — a conservative, but one lacking the combative style that has made Cuccinelli a favorite of activists — to abandon his run for governor last year. He considered an independent bid and last week launched a political action committee to recruit “mainstream” Republicans, saying his party was becoming “too extreme.”

    After losing their second presidential race in a row last fall, Republicans across the country got an earful on how to rebuild. TV talking heads, politicians and the party’s national leader advised the GOP to become more welcoming and inclusive, to change its tone on some social issues and to embrace immigration reform.

    Some delegates saw the selection of Jackson as evidence that the party is heeding calls for more racial diversity.

    Aside from that, Virginia Republicans are largely resisting that nudge to the middle. Their prescription for electoral success in 2013 and beyond calls for fielding candidates who are conservative and proud of it. One lieutenant governor candidate was accompanied by Oliver North. Another brought Allen B. West, the former Florida congressman and tea party hero.

    “The tea party leaders in Virginia are not for toning it down,” said Mark Daugherty, chairman of the Virginia Tea Party Patriots Federation, which unites 46 tea party groups across the state. “We think folks who left us billions in debt and deficits and regulations, they need to tone it down. . . . Trying to move to the middle, or moderate your view, or tone down your conservative view is the wrong approach to future electoral success.”

    Jeff Ryer, spokesman for the state Senate Republican caucus, said party activists are yearning for unabashed conservatives.

    “I just get the sense that most Republicans are looking for candidates that are forthright, that are direct,” Ryer said. “They’re looking for people who aren’t embarrassed . . . like they’re at a cocktail party and they chose the wrong fork.”

    That description could apply to North, the former Marine Corps lieutenant colonel and Iran-contra figure who attended the convention to support businessman Pete Snyder for lieutenant governor.

    “I go all over the country for my party, and I’m not ashamed to do so,” North said in an interview Friday. “The best chance we have as a party is to find young, positive, free enterprise-experienced conservatives who understand what the media describe as social issues are really deeply moral and spiritual issues. And those candidates we need have not only that full background, but they’re unashamed to stand up and say so.”

    Where Republicans celebrate a forceful trio, Democrats see a “very extreme ticket,” said Charniele L. Herring, chair of the Democratic Party of Virginia.

    “It reminds me of what my mom told me when I was a child: ‘You’re loud and you’re wrong,’ ” she said.

    No matter how the Virginia GOP’s strategy plays out in November, it will not go unnoticed. The state is one of just two with governor’s races this year. With New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) expected to win reelection, Cuccinelli’s race against former Democratic National Committee Chairman Terry McAuliffe has drawn national attention. Depending on how the race goes, Republicans across the country are likely to use Virginia’s governor’s race as a road map — or as an example of what not to do.

    “There’s only really one competitive state in terms of elections in 2013, and that’s Virginia,” said Prince William County Board of Supervisors Chairman Corey A. Stewart, who lost on the third ballot in the lieutenant governor contest. “And I think the whole nation is going to be looking to see whether the Republican Party can pull itself together, unite around a message and candidate, and beat the Democrats back.”

    Of the seven lieutenant governor candidates, only one — former state senator and delegate Jeannemarie Devolites Davis of Fairfax County — ran on a platform that explicitly called for broadening the party’s appeal to moderates and minorities. Davis, who had Bloomberg’s backing in her failed 2007 state Senate reelection bid because she supported some gun-control measures, was eliminated Saturday in the first round of balloting.

    Cuccinelli had opened his campaign with the release of a book trumpeting his view that the federal government is too intrusive and that entitlement programs breed dependency. Democrats were almost giddy, seeing it as a windfall on par with the old master’s thesis decrying “cohabitators, homosexuals [and] fornicators” that came back to haunt term-limited Gov. Robert F. McDonnell (R) during his race four years ago. Democratic legislators mocked the book, “The Last Line of Defense: The New Fight for American Liberty,” by staging a dramatic reading.

    But Republican activists applauded. “He never wavers,” said Dotti Nijakowski, director of student affairs at Liberty University School of Law, who attended the convention.

    Dave “Mudcat” Saunders, a veteran Democratic political strategist, said some Democrats and independents might be in the mood for candidates who don’t try to soft-pedal their beliefs.

    “Politicians, overall as a trade, are in the bottom of the outhouse,” he said. “And the reason is, they talk out of the side of their mouths, most of them. . . . The fact that Ken Cuccinelli’s talking out of the front of his mouth and not the side of his mouth, I think, is refreshing to everybody, whether you agree with him or not.”


    Ben Pershing contributed to this report.
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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    Virginia's Republican candidate for lieutenant governor is an extremist conservative who compares Planned Parenthood to the Ku Klux Klan.

    From POLITICO.

    Virginia pick compared Planned Parenthood to KKK

    By: Alexander Burns

    May 19, 2013 01:47 PM EDT

    The newly minted Republican nominee for lieutenant governor of Virginia once compared Planned Parenthood to the Ku Klux Klan and bemoaned black voters’ “slavish devotion” to the Democratic Party — past statements that are likely to inflame the culture-war politics of the state’s 2013 elections.

    E.W. Jackson, a black minister and activist nominated for lieutenant governor Saturday, posted a four-minute video on YouTube last fall exhorting African-Americans to vote Republican. In the video message, he accused the “civil rights establishment” of selling out their Christian values in order to support Democratic policy positions on gay marriage and abortion.

    “The Democrat Party has created an unholy alliance between certain so-called civil rights leaders and Planned Parenthood, which has killed unborn black babies by the tens of millions. Planned Parenthood has been far more lethal to black lives than the KKK ever was,” Jackson says in the video.

    And on the website of an advocacy group founded by Jackson, Staying True to America’s National Destiny, the activist organization describes abortion as “the equivalent of an idolatrous offering to the god of ‘sexual license.’”

    “It is no different than in times past when pagans offered their babies on an altar of fire to assure their own good fortune,” the STAND website says.

    The emergence of Jackson as a standard-bearer for the Republican Party could have implications beyond the race for lieutenant governor. Republican gubernatorial candidate Ken Cuccinelli has sought in recent months to keep his campaign message focused on jobs and economic concerns, while Democrats have assailed him for his staunchly conservative record on abortion and gay rights. The selection of Jackson for the GOP ticket may help keep social issues in the foreground of the 2013 debate.

    The comments about Planned Parenthood in particular are incendiary: The abortion rights-supporting group ran web ads against Cuccinelli only this last week, and the Democratic Party of Virginia produced a wave of robo-calls accusing the state attorney general of “pursuing an ideological tea party agenda that bans abortion.”

    A Jackson adviser did not respond to emails seeking comment. Republican Party of Virginia spokesman Garren Shipley defended the candidate as a person of faith and predicted the 2013 elections would not hinge on social issues.

    “It is no secret that E.W. Jackson has deeply held Christian conservative beliefs. But the race for lieutenant governor will be fought on economic ground as opposed to social policy. In the weeks and months ahead, Jackson will focus on ideas that produce more quality jobs for Virginians and make life easier for families and workers,” Shipley said in an email.

    The Harvard Divinity School graduate won the lieutenant governor nomination at the Virginia GOP convention this weekend, besting six other opponents in a drawn-out fight over the course of four ballots.

    In his video last fall, Jackson accused Democrats of having “insulted” and “manipulated” black voters by pushing them to “violate everything that we believe as Christians” at the ballot box. He likened civil rights leaders’ support for Democrats to a new kind of slavery.

    “The civil rights establishment has betrayed the black community and God Almighty for 30 pieces of silver from the Democrat Party. We as Christians ought to know better,” Jackson said. “Our ancestors were sold against their will centuries ago, but we’re going to the slave market voluntarily today. Yes, it’s just that ugly.”

    Taking aim at Democrats’ contention that same-sex marriage is a matter of civil rights, Jackson objected: “The Democrat Party has equated homosexuality with being black, which is another outrageous lie. They can keep their homosexuality private. You and I cannot hide being black.”

    “Anyone who dares equate the so-called ‘gay rights movement’ to the history of black Americans is exploiting the black community,” he said.

    Jackson did not name specific civil rights leaders he believed to have “betrayed” the black community. But the video was posted last fall at the same time as a Maryland referendum campaign over gay marriage drew in prominent veterans of the civil rights movement, including former NAACP President Julian Bond, who endorsed same-sex unions.

    There are no public polls so far on the lieutenant governor’s race, but polls have shown the gubernatorial race a close contest between Cuccinelli and Democratic nominee Terry McAuliffe, the former national party chairman. Cuccinelli has led McAuliffe among likely voters in most recent polling, with a narrower race among registered voters.

    Democrats will choose their nominee for lieutenant governor in a June primary election. State Sen. Ralph Northam and former U.S. Chief Technology Officer Aneesh Chopra are competing for the nomination.
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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    The Republican candidate for lieutenant governor of Virginia is a fountain of homophobia.
    The 10 Most Anti-Gay Statements From The Republican Nominee For Lt. Governor Of Virginia
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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    Ken Cuccinelli was doing relatively well in the polls until Virginia Republicans picked a homophobic extremist as his running mate.
    From the Washington Post.


    E.W. Jackson complicates Cuccinelli bid

    By Rachel Weiner, Published: May 20, 2013


    A nominating convention helped put Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli on the gubernatorial ballot. It might also sink his chance to win.

    Nominating conventions turn out the most committed and partisan members of the party. Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling, a more moderate Republican, dropped out of the race for governor because he knew the convention would favor Cuccinelli. And at the convention this past weekend, Cuccinelli won — but so did the Rev. E.W. Jackson, lieutenant governor candidate and a fiery conservative. Within hours, news organizations had dug up scores of controversial comments made by Jackson about abortion, homosexuality and the Democratic party.
    Among other things, he has compared Planned Parenthood to the Ku Klux Klan and referred to gays in the military as “sexually twisted.”

    All that could be a problem for Cuccinelli, who is tacking to the middle in his campaign against Democrat Terry McAuliffe. His focus is on the economy, not the social conservatism that fueled his own rise in GOP politics. Jackson’s place on the GOP ticket gives fuel to Democrats who aim to paint Cuccinelli as an extremist.

    “We’re in a deep [expletive],” said one Virginia Republican strategist. “The only good news is that the Democrats have Terry McAuliffe. It’s the only thing keeping us glued to a chance of victory.”

    McAuliffe, a former Democratic National Committee chairman, has faced questions about his leadership of an electric car company and some unflattering quotes from his own memoir.

    Asked if Jackson was trouble, another senior Virginia Republican responded, “Oh. My. God. Yes.” The danger, the Republican said, is that Jackson will bring Democrats to the polls who might otherwise stay home. “You just don’t want one candidate to rile up the base of the other side. That’s what you’re trying to avoid.”

    In Virginia, the candidates for governor and lieutenant governor run separately. Ticket-splitting happens.* In 2005, current Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling (R) beat former state Sen. Leslie Byrne (D) and served with Democratic Gov. Tim Kaine. Byrne was an unabashedly liberal candidate; Kaine ran as a moderate.

    Another relevant case is 1993, when conservative homeschooling activist Michael Farris ran for lieutenant governor on the Republican ticket. He lost to Democrat Don Beyer by a wide margin even as Republican George Allen won the gubernatorial race and Republican Jim Gilmore the race for attorney general.

    And Cuccinelli himself was elected as attorney general on the same ticket as Bolling, despite very different political styles.
    In an interview with The Post the day after the convention, Cuccinelli indicated that he would not be answering for Jackson’s controversial beliefs.

    “I am just not going to defend my running mates’ statements at every turn,” he said. “They’ve got to explain those themselves. Part of this process is just letting Virginia voters get comfortable with us, on an individual basis, personally.”

    After the convention, the Republican candidates embarked on a traditional group tour of the state. Beyond that, it won’t be surprising if we rarely see Cuccinelli campaigning with Jackson after that. But if he puts too much distance between himself and Jackson, Cuccinelli risks offending his conservative base.

    There’s something else that gives the Virginia GOP hope — what’s going on in Washington. In off-year races, Virginia voters have a tendency to vote for the party that lost the last national election, a trend that’s held since 1977 and gives Cuccinelli better odds. If President Obama’s approval rating deteriorates over the next six months, Virginia voters might vote to send a signal to the White House and leave social issues aside. The impassioned speech that helped propel Jackson to victory was largely about the federal government, not the state.

    “You cannot look at this race without looking at the national atmosphere as well,” said former Virginia Republican congressman Tom Davis. “This race will probably be 70 percent national and 30 percent state.”


    Rosalind S. Helderman contributed to this report.
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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    By choosing a homophobic extremist as their candidate for lieutenant governor Virginia Republicans have turned their state into a major LGBT battleground.

    From POLITICO.

    New gay-rights battleground: Virginia

    By: Alexander Burns

    May 23, 2013 05:07 AM EDT

    Welcome to the gay rights battleground of Virginia.

    Yes, you read that right. In the 2013 off-year elections, a state that once leaned solidly to the center-right has become the newest focal point in the national debate over same-sex relationships. A gubernatorial race already defined partly along culture-war lines has grown even more contentious since last weekend, when Virginia Republicans nominated as their lieutenant governor candidate a firebrand minister who has called gays “very sick people psychologically” and suggested a connection between homosexuality and pedophilia.

    Remarkably, in a New South battleground where Democrats have traditionally won by carving out independent, non-partisan reputations, it’s Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe who’s most eager to keep gay rights on the political front burner.


    When McAuliffe first ran for governor in 2009, he ran a conventionally cautious Democratic campaign, endorsing civil unions for gay couples but warning that Virginia would be unlikely to accept gay marriage. After all, it was only a few years earlier – in 2000 – that Republican George Allen ridiculed then-Democratic Sen. Chuck Robb for representing “Vermont values,” after his vote against the Defense of Marriage Act.

    This year, McAuliffe fully supports same-sex marriage. After Republicans nominated Rev. E.W. Jackson for lieutenant governor at their state convention last weekend, the Virginia Democratic Party held a conference call – led by openly gay state Sen. Adam Ebbin – to accuse the GOP ticket of representing “the biases of the past.” McAuliffe’s campaign issued a statement Wednesday charging that the gay-rights views of Jackson and GOP gubernatorial nominee Ken Cuccinelli were “divisive,” “dangerous” and bad for business.

    Gone, in other words, is the conventional Southern Democratic playbook of running away from the national party on culture. Encouraged by last year’s joint victories by Sen. Tim Kaine and President Barack Obama, Democrats argue this is simply The Way We Live Now in Virginia.

    Democratic strategist Mo Elleithee said the fundamentals of Virginia’s cultural politics have changed so sharply that it makes sense for the party to trumpet cultural views that appeal to the state’s increasingly urban and diverse population.

    “We are not in a defensive posture on cultural issues. Because of how much the state has changed, we can absolutely be in an offensive posture,” said Elleithee, who advised Kaine in his 2012 campaign and McAuliffe in 2009. “I don’t think the other side understands how much Virginia has changed, or they just don’t care.”

    The McAuliffe campaign’s research backs up that assessment, according to multiple operatives involved in the race, who see Cuccinelli and Jackson’s culture-warrior history as a valuable tool for motivating low-turnout Democrats in the off-cycle campaign.

    Democratic polls and focus groups have consistently found that voters react with horror to a 2008 statement by Cuccinelli that the “homosexual agenda” brings about “nothing but self-destruction, not only physically but of their soul,” as well as to Cuccinelli’s opposition to public universities including gay-rights protections in their anti-discrimination policies.

    One private Democratic poll taken last month showed that 81 percent of targeted young voters – aged 18 to 29 – called that information a “very strong reason to vote against” Cuccinelli. A March focus group of middle-class, Democratic-leaning women in Virginia Beach found Cuccinelli’s quote about the “homosexual agenda” similarly powerful.

    Public polling reinforces that picture: a Washington Post poll published earlier this month found 56 percent of Virginians now favor gay marriage, including a majority of political independents.

    That’s a stark shift since 2006, when Virginia voters approved an amendment to the state constitution banning same-sex marriage with a 57-percent majority.

    University of Virginia professor Larry Sabato said that “twenty years have made a world of difference” in Virginia politics, as far as which side of the cultural divide is safer for statewide candidates.

    “The gay rights issue here is emblematic. In the Old Dominion, a party associated with gay rights would be headed for a tumble. Now, it’s exactly the opposite. A sizeable majority in Purple Virginia do not consider the anti-gay views of Cuccinelli and Jackson to be acceptable,” Sabato said. “It’s old versus new. If the Democrats had a nominee like Tim Kaine, this contest would be over.”

    As Republicans are quick to point out, McAuliffe is not, in fact, a candidate like Kaine, a genial moderate with a long history of involvement in Virginia politics.

    If Republicans are sensitive to Cuccinelli’s vulnerability on the cultural front – not only gay rights, but also abortion and gender-related issues – they are just as acutely aware of McAuliffe’s personal vulnerabilities, centered on his spotty record in business and background as a colorful Democratic Party boss.

    So even Republicans who view debates over gay rights and gay marriage as losers for the GOP are confident their gubernatorial candidate has a clear path to victory. They are less sanguine about Jackson, who will face the voters apart from Cuccinelli in a separate election for the lieutenant governor job.

    Cuccinelli adviser Chris LaCivita said he was unconcerned about Democrats’ ability to motivate their core voters with social issues. When McAuliffe and his allies focus on topics such as gay rights and abortion, he said, conservative voters hear that message, too, and react against it.

    “The only way they can motivate their electorate is to demonize Republicans on God, guns and gays in reverse. That is a true definition of a double-edged sword,” LaCivita said. “If the Democrats want to make the election about gay marriage and we want to make the election about jobs and the economy, we’ll take that match-up any day of the week.”

    Still, the reaction of the state’s most powerful Republicans to the Jackson nomination underscores just how cautiously the GOP establishment hopes to tread on gay-rights issues. Where Democrats might once have winced at a candidate’s statement unapologetically calling for gay marriage, Republicans have responded to the emergence of Jackson with reactions that range from cautious to downright critical.

    As Jackson’s history of incendiary comments came to light earlier this week, a top aide to sitting Republican Gov. Bob McDonnell called for “civility” and “respect for all.” Republican Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling, a frequent Cuccinelli critic, called Jackson’s past remarks “indefensible.”

    Former Virginia Attorney General Jerry Kilgore, who was the GOP nominee for governor in 2005, expressed skepticism that voters would cast their gubernatorial ballots based on anything beyond core “economic issues.” But he acknowledged that conservative cultural stances aren’t necessarily the asset they might once have been.

    “I just think the state isn’t voting social issues on either side like it used to,” Kilgore said. “In the past, you could have gotten more right-of-center voters voting social issues more heavily. I just don’t think there are that many single-issue voters anymore, in Virginia especially.”

    Republicans say – mostly in private – that the addition of Jackson to the GOP ticket complicates Cuccinelli’s strategy of steering far away from his past record and statements on issues such as abortion and gay marriage. For several months now, Cuccinelli’s campaign has answered culturally-themed attacks from McAuliffe with statements accusing Democrats of seeking to distract from voters’ real concerns: jobs and the economy.

    On the Democratic side, too, there’s a recognition that the social-issue message will only be effective if voters believe it’s tied directly to their daily lives. Some voters may turn out simply to send a message to a politician they view as bigoted. But more will turn out and vote if McAuliffe and the rest of the Democratic ticket successfully argue that right-wing cultural views – embodied most vividly by Jackson – will cost Virginia jobs.

    Rick Boucher, the conservative Democrat who represented the southwestern part of the state for 14 terms in Congress, said he views Virginia as a “moderate state on social issues, as it is on most matters.

    “Terry McAuliffe has actually talked about economic development as his leading issue,” Boucher said. “The Republicans have actually carved out social issues as the leading wedge of their campaign.”

    Cuccinelli has worked hard to blunt that impression, and his allies say there’s no intention of letting Jackson compromise all that. His first television ad of the campaign featured his wife, Teiro Cuccinelli, describing his career of “standing up for the vulnerable and those in need.”

    In all likelihood, Cuccinelli will give his ticket-mate a wide berth on the campaign trail, seeking to distinguish himself from the flamboyant ideologue.

    It’s an approach that has worked for Virginia politicians in the past, when their parties have selected down-ballot candidates far from the political center. When George Allen ran for governor in 1993, he kept his distance from lieutenant governor candidate Mike Farris, an outspoken Christian conservative and home-schooling advocate.

    In 2001, then-gubernatorial candidate Mark Warner explicitly rejected Democratic attorney general candidate Don McEachin’s views on gun control.

    Two decades later, Farris said he still believes there’s a majority coalition for traditional “Virginia values,” even as both the state and the country have evolved on gay rights.

    “Society has changed its views on this. I think it has shifted far less than the polls would indicate,” Farris said. “Ken Cuccinelli’s gonna campaign on limited government and saving the taxpayers money and standing up for traditional Virginia values. But I think he’s going to have the right balance on the value issues.”
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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    The McAuliffe ads are running fast and furious in my area now. I t the rest after that have been so bland. He focuses on his business background and his "jobs first" but doesn't really talk about other issues. I guess he doesn't want to get caught up in any "morals" debates...he'll win them in northern VA but lose in the rest of the state. But if he is going to win, he has to carry this area by a big margin.

    http://action.terrymcauliffe.com/pag...mepage_rotator

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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    Quote Originally Posted by reid View Post
    The McAuliffe ads are running fast and furious in my area now. I t the rest after that have been so bland. He focuses on his business background and his "jobs first" but doesn't really talk about other issues. I guess he doesn't want to get caught up in any "morals" debates...he'll win them in northern VA but lose in the rest of the state. But if he is going to win, he has to carry this area by a big margin.

    http://action.terrymcauliffe.com/pag...mepage_rotator
    The election is still over five months away. I wonder about the effect on turn out of such an intense campaign over a long period.
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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    Cuccinelli using his position to gain political favor and contributions? Looks like it. I can't believe anyone would vote for him. I sent this to everyone I know in VA who is registered to vote.

    From The Roanoke Times

    Fraud cases show Cuccinelli's priorities
    byDAN CASEY | 981-3423


    Saturday, June 1, 2013

    School is now out, but lessons are always useful. Today we’ll have one on the term “fraud.” It means to intentionally deceive for personal gain, or to damage another.This is taught in every law school in the land, including at George Mason University, where Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli earned his shingle. Now he’s the Republican nominee for governor.
    The question of the day is, did Cuccinelli learn his law school lessons about fraud? His tenure as attorney general leaves you wondering. Let’s consider two prominent fraud cases Cuccinelli has been mixed up in.
    The first concerns former University of Virginia climate scientist Michael Mann, who’s now at Penn State. While he was at UVa, Mann published a paper that revealed the “hockey stick graph,” a chart that showed steeply rising temperatures on Earth in the past 100 years.
    It’s among data cited by climatologists around the world that suggests pollution from humans has contributed to the Earth’s warming. It wasn’t perfect, but a decade’s worth of critical analysis by other scientists has supported Mann’s research and methodology. The global warming deniers have claimed Mann cooked his data.
    Four months into his job as attorney general, Cuccinelli decided Mann’s research at UVa should be investigated to see if he had defrauded taxpayers. So he went after Mann over some research grants he’d obtained while at UVa, including a $215,000 Virginia grant to study land, atmosphere and vegetation in Africa.
    During its probe, the attorney general’s office demanded UVa turn over many documents, including emails between Mann and 39 other climate scientists around the world that went back more than a decade. Nearly two years later, the Virginia Supreme Court shot down the fishing expedition, and the investigation ended.
    By then, UVa had spent more than $350,000 defending itself on the case, and more than 900 Virginia academics had signed a letter decrying it as a witch hunt. But Cuccinelli’s stock among the global-warming-denial crowd soared. It turned him into one of their up-and-coming stars.
    The second case involves an alleged Florida con man who, under the fake identity “Bobby Thompson,” created and ran the U.S. Navy Veterans Association scam. Via telemarketing, the group raked in as much as $100 million nationwide; it reported taking in more than $2.6 million from Virginians in 2009 alone.
    That year, Virginia suspended fundraising by the U.S. Navy Vets because it had failed to comply with charity paperwork reporting requirements. Rather than submit the paperwork, Thompson made $67,500 in campaign contributions to Virginia lawmakers.
    Of that, $55,500 went in three separate contributions to then-state senator Cuccinelli, who was running for attorney general. Cuccinelli personally telephoned Thompson in August 2009 and requested the third contribution. That one was for $50,000.
    In 2010, Thompson’s hired lobbyist persuaded the Virginia General Assembly to enact a law that relieved the Navy Vets from state reporting requirements. Gov. Bob McDonnell — who got $5,000 in campaign donations from Thompson — signed the bill.
    In May 2010, this newspaper published a report about the new law and Thompson’s contributions to politicians in the state.
    McDonnell and most of the other politicians immediately distanced themselves from Thompson. They transferred his contributions to legitimate veterans organizations. And in 2011, the General Assembly repealed the law Thompson had fooled them into enacting.
    Cuccinelli, however, initially defended Thompson. First, he said he would give up Thompson’s campaign donations only if the alleged con man was convicted of a crime.
    At the end of July, after Thompson had disappeared and his own lawyer was calling him a crook, Cuccinelli relented. He said he, too, would give the Thompson contributions to bona fide veterans charities. That money was disbursed five months after the story broke.
    It turned out, Thompson’s real name is John Donald Cody. He was apprehended last year in Oregon on an Ohio warrant. He had almost $1 million in cash stuffed in a suitcase. A Harvard-educated lawyer with an Army intelligence background, he’s now in jail in Ohio, where he’s facing fraud and other charges stemming from U.S. Navy Vets operations in that state. His trial is scheduled for September. The case has been spearheaded by the Ohio attorney general.
    The Virginia AG’s office squeezed a $65,000 settlement from one of the fundraising contractors employed by the U.S. Navy Vets. But unlike Ohio, Virginia has never charged Thompson nee Cody with a single crime. Brian Gottstein, spokesman for the Virginia attorney general, explained that the AG’s office lacks jurisdiction.
    The office has claimed the best it could do is refer the complex case to a local commonwealth’s attorney to handle it. Citing a pending investigation, the AG’s office has declined all further comment.
    Here’s what the AG’s website says about its consumer protection powers: “The attorney general enforces state and federal consumer protection laws, keeping Virginians safe from things like identity theft, consumer fraud and telemarketing scams. … Complaints are either assigned within the section or referred to the appropriate local, state or federal agency having specific jurisdiction.”
    Identity theft, consumer fraud and telemarketing scams are precisely at the heart of the U.S. Navy Vets case. While Ohio drops a hammer on “Thompson,” Virginia has done little.
    But Thompson did far more than take millions from ordinary Virginians. He used a phony identity to contribute $67,500 to key Virginia politicians, then scammed the entire Virginia General Assembly into passing a law allowing him to perpetuate his fraud. Arguably, that’s even worse.
    Who is the General Assembly’s lawyer? Attorney General Cuccinelli. That’s why it seems almost inconceivable that he hasn’t gone after Thompson.
    Which brings us back to the issue of Cuccinelli and fraud.
    It appears we have an attorney general who can’t distinguish real fraud from phony fraud. Especially when the real fraud (the U.S. Navy Vets) is highly embarrassing to him, and the phony fraud (Michael Mann) is politically advantageous for him.
    The latter bought Cuccinelli not only the political fealty of global warming deniers, but since 2010 it also has helped him raise more than $450,000 in campaign contributions from oil, gas and coal barons.
    You’ll have to judge for yourself whether the witch hunt against Mann was an intentional deception for personal gain, or why Cuccinelli has been so reluctant to purse Bobby Thompson.
    But taken together, the two cases suggest political self-interest is Cuccinelli’s highest priority of all.

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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    E. W. Jackson, the GOP candidate for lieutenant governor of Virginia, is the gift that keeps on giving.
    From BuzzFeed Politics

    Va. Republican Lt. Governor Candidate
    Said Birth Defects Were Caused By Sin


    "It is the principle of sin, rebellion against God and His truth which has brought about birth defects and other destructive natural occurrences."

    June 7, 2013 at 6:11pm EDT

    Andrew Kaczynski

    The Republican nominee for lieutenant governor of Virginia, E. W. Jackson, wrote in his 2008 book Ten Commandments to an Extraordinary Life that birth defects were caused because of sin. He wrote the book when he was serving as a minister.

    The passage reads:

    Keep in mind that the whole cosmos has been made imperfect — wounded — by sin. It is the principle of sin, rebellion against God and His truth which has brought about birth defects and other destructive natural occurrences. Leaving aside that for a moment, recent discoveries about the genetic code of each human being are a fulfillment of scripture. Your genetic code is the handwriting of God, written before you or the world existed. Our genetic blueprint is proof of the existence of the Living God and His infinite intelligence, purpose and design. Sadly, many will ignore the deeper spiritual truth which underlies the advance of this scientific knowledge.

    Jackson told reporters last month, responding to past controversial comments on gays, “I say the things that I say because I’m a Christian, not because I hate anybody, but because I have religious values that matter to me.” Jackson made the comment to reporters at a campaign stop in Fredericksburg, according to the Washington Post.
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    Default Re: Virginia governor election 2013

    Gov. Bob McDonnell may be a term limited lame duck, but the scandal which has enveloped him may impact on this year's governor's race in Virginia.

    From Slate.

    Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell Asked to Resign Over Scandal

    By Mark Joseph Stern | Posted Tuesday, July 2, 2013


    Not too long ago, even after the transvaginal probe debacle, Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell was seen as a strong contender for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination. Now he's an object of scandal and ridicule. An FBI probe revealed that McDonnell failed to disclose expensive gifts from wealthy donors—including designer clothes for his wife, a wedding banquet for his daughter, a hummer stretch limousine, and a Rolex watch—leading to accusations of bribery. Now, the Virgininian-Pilot reports that Fairfax City Senator John Chapman Peterson has called for McDonnell's resignation:

    "If you or your family has received gifts of the type alleged, then you should disclose that fully and immediately," Petersen writes in a letter dated July 1.

    "If those gifts are retail consumer items which you have retained for personal use, then you should return them immediately to the donor or sell them and donate the money to the Literary Fund," his letter reads. "That is the only method by which the public can regain trust in your Office. Without that trust, there is no purpose in continuing to serve."

    If McDonnell is unable or unwilling to address the issue, Petersen offered this recommendation: "You should step down as Governor and permit the Lieutenant Governor to serve out the balance of your term."

    The scandal has also tainted Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, a Tea Party darling who is currently running to replace McDonnell when his term ends in January. Cuccinelli violated state law several years ago by failing to disclose $20,000 worth of stock in Star Scientific, a tobacco supplement company currently under federal investigation.
    I had honestly never heard of a Hummer stretch limo before reading this article so I had to look it up.

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